Treasures from the UCLA Archive: INTERNATIONAL HOUSE

International House

The manic, boisterous energy that marks many Hollywood comedies of the early sound era owes to the vaudeville stars who found second careers on the big screen. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE features “a fortune in marquee material,” including WC Fields, George Burns, Gracie Allen, and Peggy Hopkins Joyce. The story begins when eccentric Dr. Wong (Edmund Breese) calls an international conference at a swanky hotel in “Wu Hu, China” to demonstrate his latest invention, the radioscope, which can pick up images and sound from anywhere in the world. As potential investors descend on the hotel—literally in the case of Fields’s Professor Quail, who arrives via “autogyro”—various storylines emerge. Adding to the mayhem are performances on Dr. Wong’s device by popular radio entertainers Rudy Vallee, Baby Rose Marie, and Cab Calloway. (68 mins.)

 

International House W.C Fields Trailer by NilbogLAND

FOLLOWED BY

THIRTY DAY PRINCESS
DIRECTOR: MARION GERING
US, 1934
With an ebullient yet simple script penned by four different writers, including a pre-heyday Preston Sturges, THIRTY DAY PRINCESS stars Depression-era heroine Sylvia Sidney in a rare comedic turn—or, rather, two. First, Sidney shines as the European princess who travels to America to secure a much-needed loan for her country, but when she falls ill, someone has to take her place on a nationwide goodwill tour. Enter Nancy Lane (Sidney again), a struggling New York actress and the spitting image of the princess. To succeed in her new role, Nancy must convince a cynical newspaperman (Cary Grant) of her authenticity, even if it means losing her heart in the charade. “It’s fun. It’s clever. It’s suspenseful. And it presents a running fire of bright dialogue that keeps the corners of your mouth turned up.”—Chicago Daily Tribune. (74 mins.)

READ A REVIEW OF THIRTY DAY PRINCESS HERE

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE preservation funded by The Packard Humanities Institute. Preserved in conjunction with Universal Pictures from a 35mm composite nitrate print and a 35mm acetate dupe negative. Laboratory services by The Stanford Theatre Film Laboratory, Audio Mechanics, DJ Audio, Simon Daniel Sound. Special thanks to Bob O’Neil.

THIRTY DAY PRINCESS preservation funded by The Packard Humanities Institute. Preserved in cooperation with Universal Pictures from a 35mm nitrate composite print. Laboratory services by The Stanford Theatre Film Laboratory, Audio Mechanics, DJ Audio.

 

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE and THIRTY DAY PRINCESS screen Wednesday, January 15 at 7m in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The films are being presented as part of our Treasures from the UCLA Archive series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: