Northwest Tracking: MAKOSHIKA

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Taking its title from the Lakota name “Mako Shika,” meaning “bad land,” MAKOSHIKA focuses on the lonely prairie landscapes of eastern Montana, where graduating classes of local one-room schoolhouses can often be composed of only a single student. First-time feature director Hart weaves alternating first-person narratives together with engrossing historical commentary to tell the story of a region in transition, largely due to oil development fueled by the nearby Bakken shale formations. Like the prospectors of years past, modern-day fortune hunters are making their way into these remote lands…while holding the fates of local communities in the balance. (65 mins.) 

Jessica Jane Hart and Fractured Media will introduce the film.

 

MAKOSHIKA screens Thursday, January 14 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located inside the Portland Art Museum).  The program is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Tracking: AN EVENING WITH LION ATTACK MOTION PICTURES

Lion Attack_2

Filmmakers Austin Will, Sam Kuhn and Fantavious Fritz form a collective known as Lion Attack Motion Pictures. The energetic group began their careers in the Pacific Northwest before expanding their operations to New York, Toronto and Miami. Join us on this special night as the three filmmakers return to their home state of Oregon to screen a selection of their award-winning films. The program will include PARADISE FALLS (2014), an idiosyncratic tale of two boys’ adventures in an abandoned suburban mansion, IN SEARCH OF THE MIRACULOUS (2015), an ironic homage to the enigmatic Dutch artist Bas Jan Ader, and LONG WAY GONE (2014), a surreal portrait following a lost soul navigating ghostly landscapes in search of shelter from a vicious storm. (80 mins.) 

Filmmakers in attendance.

 

AN EVENING WITH LION ATTACK MOTION PICTURES screens Wednesday, January 13 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located inside the Portland Art Museum).  The program is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Northwest Tracking: THE SOMNAMBULISTS w director Mark Andres in attendance

Mark Andres_3

Self-described as a “kinographic novel,” THE SOMNAMBULISTS combines stylized drawings, inter-titles and music to fashion an intriguing combination of graphic novel and early silent cinema. In the year 2047, a new drug called Somnambula, which does away with the need for sleep, arrives to a city below the Moon’s surface. As the residents wander about in a sleepless daze, Bruno, a former circus performer, searches for his missing partner, a boy who has mysteriously disappeared. Bruno’s search leads him to the inventor of Somnambula, who seems to have the power to control others with his mind. Winner of the Best Animated film at the 2015 Independent Filmmakers’ Showcase in Los Angeles, Andres’s film is a hypnotic fantasy and a meditation on the nature of love. (94 mins.) 

 

An exhibition of drawings from the film is currently on display at the Augen Gallery. Mark Andres will introduce the film. 

THE SOMNAMBULISTS screens Wednesday, January 6 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our ongoing Northwest Tracking series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

NWFest42: VOYAGERS WITHOUT TRACE

Voyagers Without Trace

In the summer of 1938, filmmaker Bernard de Colmont, his new wife Genevieve and their friend, Antoine de Seynes, set off from France on the biggest adventure of their lives. They had a bold, perhaps even foolhardy plan: be the first to take kayaks down the mighty Green and Colorado rivers. 75 years later, Portland filmmaker Ian McCluskey (ELOQUENT NUDE, SUMMER SNAPSHOT) discovered their story and after finding their journals, photographs and 16mm film documenting their journey, (some of the first-ever color film) he decided to retrace their route. Between 1938 and 2012 much changed on the river. And much remains the same, including wild unknowns, overwhelming beauty and explorers documenting their journey.

VOYAGERS WITHOUT TRACE screens Sunday, November 15 at 8pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

NWFest42: HADWIN’S JUDGEMENT

Hadwin's Judgement

Grant Hadwin was a logging engineer and expert woodsman whose job was finding and removing the largest, oldest and most valuable trees from British Columbia’s remote and ancient forests. Unable to reconcile his love for the forest with the highly skilled part that he was playing in destroying it, Hadwin was driven to commit a strange and unprecedented crime. Interweaving speculation, myth and reality HADWIN’S JUDGEMENT charts his descent into torment and self-destruction, a journey that ended with a mysterious discovery that made him not just a madman, but also a visionary. “Offers a timely warning that is engaging, cinematic and yet refreshingly unpolemical. The film manages to situate the viewer both within the environment that moved Hadwin so profoundly and in his very troubled mental space.”—POV Magazine.

 

HADWIN’S JUDGEMENT screens Sunday, November 15 at 6pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

NWFest42: THE WAY WE TALK

The Way We Talk

Michael Turner (THE LIFE OF VESPER GEER), winner of the 2015 Oregon Media Arts Fellowship, struggles with one of medical science’s most baffling and enduring disabilities—stuttering. On the surface, stuttering is syllable repetitions, prolongations, blocks, and various physical tics. But as he illustrates in the film, stuttering is like an iceberg, with most of the major symptoms below the surface. Emotions caused by the disorder— anxiety, depression, denial, and negative self-image—are rarely confronted in speech therapy or even by people who stutter. Turner explores his own experiences with stuttering and presents the stories of others who are part of the self-help movement within the stuttering community; stories that are relatable to anyone who has experienced feelings of separateness, isolation, or inadequacy in any area of their lives.

THE WAY WE TALK screens Sunday, November 15 at 4pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

NWFest42: DRAWING THE TIGER

Drawing the Tiger

Filmed over the course of seven years, DRAWING THE TIGER focuses on the lives of a family of Nepalese subsistence farmers and their daily struggles. The parents have watched their children go off in different directions. Their hopes for a brighter future are pinned almost solely on their eldest daughter, Shanta, who has been studying voraciously to become a doctor in an underfunded, poorly run school. When Shanta is awarded a scholarship for a city education in Kathmandu the fulfillment of her dreams feels imminent, but opportunity is coupled with the kind of sacrifice that comes with the responsibility of singlehandedly pulling her family out of poverty. “A quietly powerful film that will stick with viewers long after it ends. It’s a major work by people who clearly put everything they had and more into making it.”—Toronto Film Scene.

DRAWING THE TIGER screens Sunday, November 15 at 2pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

NWFest42: AND WE WERE YOUNG

And We Were Young

Andy Smetanka’s work has ranged from creating a short segment for Guy Maddin’s MY WINNEPEG to ‘The Bachelor and the Bride,’ a music video for the Decemberists. For his first feature-length film, Smetanka turned to his fascination with World War I. Three years and over 250,000 individual frames in the making, AND WE WERE YOUNG is a stop-motion animated oral history of American soldiers in France in the last days of the Great War, performed entirely by black-paper puppets and filmed on Super 8 against translucent paper backgrounds. Brooding, brutal and hauntingly beautiful, this epic is a vision of war beyond your wildest dreams and nightmares.

AND WE WERE YOUNG screens Sunday, November 15 at 11:30am in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

NWFest42: THE CURIO with 198

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Based on his short film of the same name, Dahl’s first feature weaves documentary and narrative elements into a poignant and funny memoir about the collapse of his marriage and subsequent struggles to find his footing in the bohemian paradise that is Portland, Oregon. His ex-wife, parents, and brothers appear as themselves in the film and scripted material, footage from the director’s married life, and interviews with family and friends paint the picture of a somewhat misguided late-bloomer experiencing all the freedom, loneliness and humiliation that come with having to start over when the bloom is off the rose.

PRECEDED BY

198
Under the pressure of a hanging marriage proposal, a young woman attempts to avoid reality during an ill-conceived night of drinking, smoking…and bowling.

THE CURIO with 198 screens Saturday, November 14 at 8:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

NWFest42: WELCOME TO THE CIRCUS

Welcome to the Circus

Set in the West Bank city of Ramallah, The Palestinian Circus School welcomes The Lido, a visiting circus school from France. In a month, the two schools must come together to create a mobile circus for children. Living in the West Bank means that mastering acrobatics isn’t the only challenge for a traveling Palestinian circus—hitting the road means an obstacle course of permits and checkpoints along the way. But for these students, the circus is a form of peaceful resistance; instead of surrendering to despair, they overcome their difficult circumstances through the power of art and unity.

WELCOME TO THE CIRCUS screens Saturday, November 14 at 1:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.

Tickets are available online or at the door.