Orson Welles at 100: CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT aka FALSTAFF

Falstaff 1

His third “finished” Shakespeare adaptation, CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT, sees Welles dulling his edges a bit in offering up a highly poetic vision of Falstaff, a recurring character in the Bard’s works. Falstaff, the rotund sidekick of the devious Prince Hal (Keith Baxter), plays audience proxy as the Prince ascends to the throne following the defeat of Henry IV’s (John Gielgud) enemies. “The one Welles film that deserves to be called lovely. Restrained and even serene, it is ample proof of how sensitive and subtle an artist he is.”—Dave Kehr, The Chicago Reader.

New digital restoration courtesy of Janus Films.

CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT aka FALSTAFF screens Saturday, January 2 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: MAGICIAN: THE ASTONISHING LIFE AND WORK OF ORSON WELLES

MAGICIAN

“Oscar-winner Chuck Workman’s (famed for his Academy Award clip montages and iconic trailers) impressive, comprehensive documentary tells the tragic, extraordinary story of Orson Welles, a great filmmaking genius whose masterpieces were interspersed with films compromised by studio intervention or never completed at all. Workman tells Welles’s story through a wealth of interviews with the director and actor, an impressive assortment of clips, and testimonies by luminaries including Martin Scorsese, Peter Bogdanovich, George Lucas, Walter Murch, and Steven Spielberg.”—Telluride Film Festival.

MAGICIAN: THE ASTONISHING LIFE AND WORK OF ORSON WELLES screens Saturday, January 2 at 4:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles: THE TRIAL

The Trial 4

Welles translates one of Franz Kafka’s best-known literary works into a disorienting black-and-white cinematic world of crime and punishment. After relatively anonymous bank officer Josef K. (Anthony Perkins) is spontaneously arrested and charged with an unnamed crime, he struggles in vain to discover exactly what it is he has done. While Kafka’s novel is famed for its psychological modernism, Welles’ film delves deep into the psyche of Josef through Perkins’ nervous tics and the unnamed city’s white walls and modernist cubes. Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide.

THE TRIAL screens Friday, January 1 at 7pm and Saturday, January 2 at 2pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: COMPULSION

Compulsion 1

If anyone was born to play a high-powered, world-weary lawyer defending two murderers against the death penalty, it was Orson Welles. With archetypal bravado, but never looking more exhausted, Welles defends Judd and Artie (Dean Stockwell and Bradford Dillman), who have killed a schoolboy seemingly out of pampered, silver-spoon boredom. Based upon the infamous real-life Leopold and Loeb murders and shot in beautiful black-and-white CinemaScope with frames populated by ornate locations—libraries, Ivies, courtrooms, and well-heeled brats—Fleischer’s film showcases Welles’ range while offering trenchant commentary on a topic still very relevant today.

New digital restoration courtesy of 20th Century Fox Archive.

 

COMPULSION screens Sunday, December 27 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: CONFIDENTIAL REPORT aka MR. ARKADIN

Mr. Arkadin 1

Bearing key similarities to THE THIRD MAN, Welles’ noir concerns small-time smuggler Guy Van Stratten (Robert Arden), who overhears a dying man whisper the name “Gregory Arkadin.” Armed with this clue and in search of blackmail money, Van Stratten works his way into the inner circle of well-to-do amnesiac Arkadin. Arkadin hires Van Stratten to research his former life before the amnesia, but as Van Stratten digs deeper people begin turning up dead. Full of delirious canted angles and gorgeous location photography spanning Europe and Mexico, CONFIDENTIAL REPORT is “extraordinary, and unjustly unrecognized.”—Richard Brody, The New Yorker.

CONFIDENTIAL REPORT aka MR. ARKADIN screens Saturday, December 26 at 7pm and Sunday, December 27 at 4:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: TOUCH OF EVIL

Touch of Evil 1

Celebrated as one of the greatest film noirs ever made, Welles’ mid-career morality tale sees him writing, directing, and starring as detective Hank Quinlan, a corrupt, exalcoholic cop working just north of the US-Mexico border. The legendary three-minute tracking shot that opens the film introduces us to Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston), a Mexican police detective who begins to investigate the mysterious death-by-explosion of two Americans at the border crossing. As Vargas uncovers more and more layers of corruption in the unnamed border town, Quinlan simultaneously falls off the wagon and tightens his deadly grip around Vargas and his comely new bride (Janet Leigh).

TOUCH OF EVIL screens Saturday, December 26 at 4:30pm and Monday, December, 28 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: THE STRANGER

The Stranger 2

Welles’ post-war thriller tackles Nazism head-on as UN War Crimes Inspector Wilson (Edward G. Robinson) searches for Welles’ fugitive Franz Kindler, an architect of the Holocaust now posing as a schoolteacher in small-town America. Kindler, now Charles Rankin, is married to the daughter of a Supreme Court justice and lives an unassuming life. But when Wilson releases Kindler’s former associate (Konstantin Shayne), the Nazi fugitive falls squarely in Wilson’s crosshairs. His secret double life is threatened with exposure, and he’ll do anything to keep it under wraps.

THE STRANGER screens Tuesday, December 22 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: OTHELLO

Othello 1

Among Welles’ finished films, OTHELLO has one of the most troubled production histories. Financed largely out-of-pocket and shot intermittently over a three-year period, OTHELLO nevertheless remains one of Welles’ most beautiful works; a compact, powerful drama fraught with taut atmospheric pleasure. As with MACBETH before it, Welles takes liberties with Shakespeare’s original work, which concerns the Moorish general Othello (Welles) and his new wife Desdemona (Suzanne Cloutier), who are manipulated and betrayed by their jealous subordinates. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

New digital restoration of the 1992 reconstruction, originally supervised by Beatrice Welles-Smith.

 

OTHELLO screens Sunday, December 20 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: MACBETH

Macbeth 4

Welles’ passion project was made at the scrappy Republic Pictures on discarded lots previously used for Roy Rogers Westerns. At the time of its production it was only the fourth Hollywood adaptation of a Shakespeare work. Despite its low-budget origins, MACBETH retains a striking visual style consistent with Welles’ earlier films in addition to a psychological intensity found in few films of the period. Welles stars at Macbeth, an ambitious Scottish general intent on acquiring power by any means necessary, whose moral corruption is spurred on by Jeanette Nolan’s conniving Lady Macbeth. Welles dives into the role, his immense dramatic powers channeled through a thick Scottish brogue.

35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive; restoration funding provided by The Film Foundation and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

MACBETH screens Saturday, December 19 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Orson Welles at 100: BLACK MAGIC

Black Magic (1949)Directed by Gregory Ratoff, Orson WellesShown: Orson Welles

Meteoric rise and precipitous fall—hallmarks of Welles’ work, especially in the 1940s—are given the magical treatment in BLACK MAGIC, an adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ 1848 novel CAGLIOSTRO. Welles plays the magician Cagliostro, who, following a literally torturous childhood, rises to fame after he learns the art of hypnosis and uses his new skill to exact revenge on the court of Louis XV. The film bears many of Welles’ signature cinematic flourishes, including stunning use of point-of-view camera.

35mm preservation print courtesy of the Library of Congress.

BLACK MAGIC screens Sunday, December 20 at 4:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Orson Welles at 100 series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.