On Art and Artists: DOWNTOWN 81

Downtown 81

This fanciful urban fairytale is an essential time capsule of post-punk club land in Lower East Side Manhattan in the early 1980s. The not yet famous artist Jean-Michel Basquiat stars, along with such hipsters as John Lurie, Lydia Lunch, Vincent Gallo, Deborah Harry, and rap legend Melle Mel, as he makes his way in a scene exploding with new wave music, new painting, hip-hop, and graffiti. Among the leading bands of the era captured onscreen are Kid Creole and the Coconuts, James White and the Blacks, DNA, Tuxedo Moon, The Plastics, Walter Steding and the Dragon People, Suicide, and Basquiat’s own band, Gray. (73 min.)

On view at the Portland Art Museum, Nov 4–Feb 21, is “Paige Powell: The Ride,” a three-channel digital projection and installation featuring her personal archive of never-seen recordings and images of Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and the New York art world in the 1980s.

 

DOWNTOWN 81 screens Saturday, October 31 at 4:30pm and Wednesday, November 4 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our On Art and Artists series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Announcing the Northwest Filmmakers’ Expo – event on November 12, 2015

Northwest Filmmakers' Expo poster SMALL

(PORTLAND, OR) – The Northwest Film Center is excited to announce an innovative new addition to this year’s Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival. To compliment the festival, the very first Northwest Filmmakers’ Expo will bring together buyers and users of filmmaking equipment and services with top regional and international vendors offering a hands-on look at their latest technology and the multitude of filmmaking resources available. Already confirmed vendors include Canon, Zeiss, JVC, Panasonic, and Sony among many others.

While drawing heavily from film and video industry professionals, the Expo—built into the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival (named one of the top 25 Coolest Film Festivals by Moviemaker Magazine) —will also be a different breed of Expo with many of the top creative agencies in the Northwest also contributing their time and ideas to make this an Expo like no other, one uniquely suited to the Portland creative film community.

The Expo will wrap up at 5pm followed by the 42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival’s Opening Night program of short films next door at the Northwest Film Center’s Whitsell Auditorium, and closing the day with the Festival’s Opening Night Party with plenty of filmmakers, music, drinks and an out-of-jury premiere screening of Lower Boom’s JOAN.


Event time and location
:
November 12 – Thursday 10am-5pm
Fred & Suzanne Fields (aka Sunken) Ballroom – 1219 SW Park Ave.

The Northwest Film Center is a regional media arts organization offering a variety of exhibition, education programs, and artist services throughout the region.  The Center presents a program of foreign, classic, experimental, and independent works year-round at the Whitsell Auditorium, located in the Portland Art Museum.  For more information, visit www.nwfilm.org.

Northwest Film Center’s Whitsell Auditorium Portland Art Museum-1219 SW Park Avenue
Expo Admission is $10.
Advance Tickets: http://bit.ly/1ZE9KyP

42nd Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival Opening Night shorts program is $9.

Opening Night screening + party is $15.
Advance Tickets: http://bit.ly/1LuqL8o

 

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AI WEIWEI: THE FAKE CASE

Ai Weiwei The Fake Case

Against a backdrop of strict censorship and an unresponsive legal system, Ai has continued to meet the full force of the Chinese authorities, who have done everything they can to stifle his attempts to express himself and organize people through art and social media. Following his 2011 arrest and subsequent solitary confinement, THE FAKE CASE follows Ai Weiwei after his parole through his battle with a thwarting suit for tax evasion: a lawsuit that he dubs “the Fake Case.” But the troubles with his enemies only continue to provide inspiration for making new art, the only outlet to vent his frustration. “The film picks up where AI WEIWEI: NEVER SORRY left off, serving as not just an update but an even more galvanizing call for reform. Ai’s voice carries louder than ever before.”—Variety. (86 mins.)

Presented in conjunction with the Portland Art Museum’s exhibition of  Ai Weiwei’s “Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads: Gold,” on view through September 13. Free admission for Portland Art Museum members.

 

AI WEIWEI: THE FAKE CASE screens Sunday, July 19 at 3pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).

Tickets are available online or at the door.

OUT OF THE ARCHIVES: YOUTH-MADE FILMS FROM ACROSS OREGON

Out of the Archives 2

Since 1977, the Film Center’s statewide Filmmakers-in-the-Schools Program has partnered with K-12 schools and community organizations around Oregon to bring the power of filmmaking to young people through artist residencies with Film Center faculty. Hundreds of youth-authored films have been made, many of them now a capsule in time. With support from a grant from the Oregon Heritage Commission and Oregon Parks & Recreation Department, 84 of these films have recently been rescued from the clutches of aging videotape stock by being digitized onto archival media. Drawing from those archives, this screening presents a vintage youth-eye view of how family and community define and reflect us and includes: KEEP OUR LAND FOR THE FUTURE (1991), about how young people are helping to shape the future of the rural community of Pine Creek, Oregon, created through an artist residency with Kristy Edmunds; THOUGHT I KNEW: FACING REALITY FROM THE INSIDE (1993), a call out from incarcerated teens in the MacLaren Correctional Facility in Salem, Oregon, about living a life of honesty, sobriety and personal responsibility, created with artist-in-residence Christopher Ley; and FRIENDS FIRST (1992), a Romeo and Juliet-inspired story of escape and recovery, created with Taft High School in Newport, Oregon, and artist-in-residence Sharon Genasci.

 

OUT OF THE ARCHIVES: YOUTH-MADE FILMS FROM ACROSS OREGON screens Friday, April 10 at 5:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).

Free with admission to the Portland Art Museum, which is $5 after 5 PM on Fridays.

Italian Style: SUMMERTIME – 35mm print!

summertime3

Jane (Katharine Hepburn), a lonely American spinster on vacation in Venice and hoping to find romance, succumbs to a passionate, bittersweet affair with Renato (Rossano Brazzi), a married Italian antique dealer. A visually enchanting valentine to the glories of the city as well as an endearing love story, Jane’s transformation from gloom to joy is echoed in an evolving wardrobe designed by Rosi Gori. A key item is a certain pair of red mules designed by Pompei in 1955 and reproduced in more recent years by Giuseppe Zanotti. “The film had an enormous effect on tourism. I remember the head of a hotel chain coming up to me and saying, ‘We ought to put a monument up to you.’”—David Lean. (102 mins.)

SUMMERTIME screens Sunday, March 15 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: JULIET OF THE SPIRITS – 35mm print!

Juliet-of-the-Spirits

The female counterpoint to 8½, Fellini ventures deeply into the surreal as JULIET OF THE SPIRITS explores the repressed desires of a bourgeois housewife, played by Giulietta Masina who stars as a middle-aged woman haunted by hallucinations from her past and subconscious. While her husband philanders, she consults clairvoyants and mediums and escapes into a world of imagination drawn from the “spirits” of her past, present, and future. In an effort to prevent her world from crumbling, she confronts the specters and fantasies that have imprisoned her throughout her life. A lavish and baroque visual spectacle, JULIET boasts Gianni de Venanzo’s brilliant cinematography, a memorable score by Nino Rota, and the opulent fashion designs of Piero Gheradi, who won Oscars for Best Costume Design for LA DOLCE VITA and 8½. Winner of the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Picture. (148 mins.)

JULIET OF THE SPIRITS screens Saturday, March 14 at 7pm and Sunday, March 15 at 4pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: L’AVVENTURA – 35mm print!

claudia_sandro

Antonioni’s meditation on meaning in modern existence remains an obligatory experience in existential cinema-going. On a yachting trip off Sicily, a woman (Lea Massari) mysteriously disappears during an excursion on a desolate island. Her lover (Gabriele Ferzetti) and her friend (Monica Vitti) begin a search, but during the fruitless quest, each slowly becomes enamored with the other and their guilt is soon replaced by passion. L’AVVENTURA is at once a mesmerizing mystery, a thought-provoking study of human behavior—the impermanence of romance, bourgeois boredom, and the ease with which we betray one another—an experiment in the expressive use of landscape, costume, and architecture, and an allegory on the troubled state of postwar Italy. Adriana Berselli’s costumes introduced a modern, understated Italian glamour, blending with the landscape as a key element to understanding the characters and their purposeless lives. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Cannes. (143 mins.)

L’AVVENTURA screens Friday, March 13 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: VALENTINO: THE LAST EMPEROR

Thandie Newton

Shot by Vanity Fair Correspondent Matt Tyrnauer between 2005 and 2007, VALENTINO: THE LAST EMPEROR, offers an intimate and engaging, fly-on-the-wall insight into the personal and business life of one of Italy’s most famous fashion designers, Valentino Garavani. With unprecedented levels of access, we’re drawn into a rarified world of haute couture, glamour, and unabashed excess. Then in the twilight of his years, Valentino and his longtime partner, Giancarlo Giammetti, move regally between exotic locations and events worldwide as they prepare for Valentino’s final show. “At turns touchy and catty, a must-see for fashion-lovers and pop culture addicts alike.”—New York Times Magazine. (90 mins.)

VALENTINO: THE LAST EMPEROR screens Sunday, March 8 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: ROMAN HOLIDAY

Roman-Holiday-2

The first Hollywood film to be shot and produced on location in Italy, ROMAN HOLIDAY made Audrey Hepburn an enduring international star and fashion icon. Princess Ann (Hepburn), on a visit to Rome, decides to try to escape her stifling royal identity and head out to see the city incognito. She runs into American reporter Gregory Peck, and love blossoms as they discover the charms of the eternal city in a way that stimulated Italian tourism and fashion consciousness like no film before it. The winner of three Academy Awards for Best Screenplay (Ian McLellan Hunter, John Dighton), Best Actress (Audrey Hepburn), and Best Costume Design (Edith Head) in collaboration with the Fontana Sisters. (117 mins.)

ROMAN HOLIDAY screens Saturday, March 7 at 7pm and Sunday, March 8 at 4:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.

The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Italian Style: LA DOLCE VITA

la-dolce-vita-2

Fellini’s emotional travelogue of the soul of modern Rome is a seductive meditation on what was truly meaningful (if anything) for the dusk-to-dawn Italian jet set of the era. Marcello Mastroianni was catapulted into superstar status in America as the sensitive (and Brioni-suited) tabloid reporter juggling the affections of several women (voluptuous movie star Anita Ekberg, icy mistress Anouk Aimée, and neurotic girlfriend Magali Noel) while making the rounds of the spirit-destroying nightlife of the Via Veneto. The film’s costumes–which won Piero Gherardi the Academy Award for Best Costume Design–portray a sophisticated, expensively dressed, and sensually alluring Mastroianni, an elegantly feline Aimée wearing black dresses and cat’s-eye sunglasses, and an impossibly glamorous Ekberg. “I feel that decadence is indispensable to rebirth.”—Fellini. (185 mins.)

LA DOLCE VITA screens Friday, March 6 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Italian Style series.
The Portland Art Museum’s exhibition, “Italian Style: Fashion Since 1945,” provides the inspiration for this survey of iconic Italian and Italian-set classics from the 1950s and 60s. During this era, Italian fashion, and everything from Italian thought, attitude, and automobiles to food, design, and Vespas, influenced audiences, filmmakers and culture worldwide—especially in the United States. A legacy of alluring films, directors, and stars timelessly endures, still providing inspiration and an unmistakably Italian vision of pop culture cool.

Tickets are available online or at the door.