Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – DREAMCATCHER

Dreamcatcher

For 25 years Brenda Myers-Powell called herself ‘Breezy’ and she dominated her world—or that’s what she thought. In reality, this world had turned her into a teenage, drug-addicted prostitute. After a violent encounter with a customer, Brenda woke up in the hospital and decided to change her life. Today, she is a beacon of hope and a pillar of strength for hundreds of women and girls as young as fourteen who want to change their own lives. With warmth and humor, DREAMCATCHER explores the cycle of neglect, violence, and exploitation that leaves uncountable girls and women feeling that prostitution is their only option to survive. By following the very charming, charismatic and truly empathic Brenda, we understand their realities from their points of view and the difference that one person can make in the lives of many. Winner of the Directing Award, World Cinema Documentary. (98 min.)

Brenda Meyers-Powell will introduce the film with producer Lisa Stevens.

 

DREAMCATCHER screens Sunday, October 18 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – SOMETHING BETTER TO COME

SOMETHING BETTER TO COME

Polish filmmaker Hanna Polak was working for an NGO helping homeless children in Moscow when she befriended a ten-year-old girl living with her family on the Svalka, the largest garbage dump/ landfill in Europe, just a few miles from the Kremlin. Surrounded by a tall fence and guards, the area is closely monitored to keep intruders out. Within exists a lawless society—seemingly hopeless, but somehow sparked by communal solidarity and optimism for the future. Polak’s captivating, sometimes heartwarming film was the winner of the Special Jury Award at the International Documentary Film Association Festival in Amsterdam. “Eye-opening. Sequences of spectacularly dystopian-apocalyptic, third-world bleakness are leavened by moments of incongruous beauty, even grace.”—The Hollywood Reporter. In Russian with English subtitles. (98 min.)

SOMETHING BETTER TO COME screens Saturday, October 17 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – THE TRIALS OF SPRING

THE TRIALS OF SPRING

Three courageous women in post-2011 Egypt fight for the original goals of the Arab Spring:“Bread, Freedom, and Social Justice” for all. The battles they wage each day reflect the uncertain crossroads at which the country and its women find themselves. A formerly veiled widow provides guidance for revolutionaries 40 years her junior. A young women’s rights activist demands an end to sexual harassment. A human rights defender from a rural military family is arrested and tortured, setting off a personal quest for justice that mirrors the trajectory of Egypt’s uprisings. (76 min.)

Sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Oregon.

 

THE TRIALS OF SPRING screens Sunday, October 11 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – CARTOONISTS: FOOT SOLDIERS OF DEMOCRACY?

CARTOONISTS

Traveling five continents, Valloatto profiles a dozen men and women whose job, obligation, and clear source of joy is to distill the chaos of world politics into a few vivid pen strokes and a pithy quip. The grand tradition of political cartoonists speaking (or rather drawing) truth to power is continued by these artists, from French cartoonist Plantu’s merciless portraits of Sarkozy’s anxious inefficiency to the plump, contentedly smiling cats with which Nadia Khiari satirizes the lazy arrogance of Tunisia’s leadership. Such caricatures haven’t sat well with all their targets, of course, and many of the interviewees share tales of censorship, imprisonment, or worse. Thankfully, none of these experiences has led any of these cartoonists to despair or silence. Instead, their determination to call out corruption and hypocrisy only seems strengthened by such attacks. (106 min.)

Sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Oregon.

 

CARTOONISTS: FOOT SOLDIERS OF DEMOCRACY? screens Sunday, October 4 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – WE COME AS FRIENDS

We Come as Friends 2

Best known for DARWIN’S NIGHTMARE, a riveting investigation into the decimation of tribal culture by Western farm-fishing in Tanzania’s Lake Victoria, Hubert Sauper’s new film—winner of the Special Jury Prize for Cinematic Bravery at the Sundance Film Festival—probes the distressed state of modern Sudan. Arriving in a tiny, homemade airplane, Sauper interviews an array of exploited local villagers, brash Chinese oil workers, and ethically awry international politicians. They are all fighting for their piece of South Sudan’s recently partitioned state, which Sauper plumbs with an eye for the ironies, tragedy, and humor unending. “At the moment when the Sudan, the continent’s biggest country, is being divided into two nations, an old ‘civilizing’ pathology re-emerges—that of colonialism, the clash of empires, and new episodes of bloody (and holy) wars over land and resources.”—BBC. In English, Arabic and Mandarin with English subtitles. (110 min.)

WE COME AS FRIENDS screens Friday, October 2 at 7pm, Saturday, October 3 at 4:30pm and 7pm, and Sunday, October 4 at 4:30pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum). The film is showing as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.

Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – NELSON MANDELA: THE MYTH AND ME

Nelson Mandela The Myth and Me

Khalo Matabane was an idealistic teenager with fanciful ideas about a post-apartheid era of freedom and justice when the great icon of liberation Nelson Mandela was released from prison in 1990. In a personal odyssey encompassing an imaginary letter to Mandela and conversations with politicians, activists, intellectuals, and artists, Matabane questions the meaning of freedom, reconciliation, and forgiveness—and challenges Mandela’s legacy in today’s world of conflict and inequality. (86 mins.)

NELSON MANDELA: THE MYTH AND ME screens Thursday, November 6 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – WATCHERS OF THE SKY

Watchers of the Sky

Interweaving four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, WATCHERS OF THE SKY uncovers the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin—the man who created the word “genocide” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize–winning book A Problem from Hell, Belzberg’s film embarks on a provocative journey from Nuremberg, Germany, to The Hague, Netherlands, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action. (120 mins.)

WATCHERS OF THE SKY screens Thursday, October 30 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – PRIVATE VIOLENCE

Private Violence

PRIVATE VIOLENCE explores a simple but deeply disturbing fact of American life: the most dangerous place for a woman in America is her own home. Every day in the U.S. at least four women are murdered by abusive (and often, ex-) partners. Through the eyes of two survivors—Deanna Walters, a mother who seeks justice for the crimes committed against her at the hands of her estranged husband, and Kit Gruelle, an advocate who seeks justice for all women—we bear witness to the complex realities of intimate partner violence. In the process, the film shapes powerful, new questions that hold the potential to change our society: “Why does he abuse?” “Why do we turn away?” “How do we build a future without domestic violence?” (81 mins.)

PRIVATE VIOLENCE screens Sunday, October 26 at 7pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film – A QUIET INQUISITION

A Quiet Inquisition

At a public hospital in Nicaragua, OBGYN Dr. Carla Cerrato must choose between following a law that bans all abortions and endangers her patients or taking a risk and providing the care that she knows can save a woman’s life. In 2007, the government of Daniel Ortega, a former Marxist revolutionary who converted to Catholicism to win votes, overturned a 130-year-old law protecting therapeutic abortion. The new law entirely prohibits abortion, even in cases of rape, incest, or when a woman’s life is at stake. As Carla and her colleagues navigate this dangerous dilemma, the impact of this law emerges—illuminating the tangible reality of prohibition against the backdrop of a political, religious, and historically complex national identity. (65 mins.)

A QUIET INQUISITION screens Sunday, October 26 at 5pm in our Whitsell Auditorium (located in the Portland Art Museum).  The film is being presented as part of our Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film series.
Tickets are available online or at the door.

Feast on Fall Offerings: Download Our September/October 2014 Schedule

The print edition of our September/October 2014 is hitting the streets right now and is on its way to mailboxes all around town.  We’re really excited about our upcoming lineup, which includes:

classes & workshops at our School of Film
–the 32nd annual Reel Music Film Festival
–a Portland stop-off for the touring Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema series
–the local and regional selections that populate our Northwest Tracking series
–a curated collection of new restorations and prints that we’re calling (Re)Discoveries
–the 2014 edition of Voices in Action: Human Rights on Film
–and much more

If you’d like a handy & portable digital version of the schedule to comb over, you’ve come to the right place.  Just click on the image below to view, download or embed our September/October schedule: